Screen-Dream - Outside view
Exposition room at ISBA, Besançon, 2006

1 / 5

Screen-Dream - Outside view
Exposition room at ISBA, Besançon, 2006

2 / 5

Screen-Dream - Inside view
Exposition room at ISBA, Besançon, 2006

3 / 5

Screen-Dream - Inside view
Exposition room at ISBA, Besançon, 2006

4 / 5

ECRAN-RÊVE / SCREEN-DREAM

Installation composed of 12 sheets of Japanese paper, 1m70 by 70 cm, Indian ink and blacklead / 2006 / variable dimensions

Just as any definite object has originally emerged from a common well of matter, formless and without limit, this installation is intended as a space this side of the imaginary. Faced with the shapeless and shifting, the spectator can draw out of this pool, this well, or better this fons (from the Latin fons = « spring ») matrixes for images that make and un-make themselves, returning to their common source, allowing others to take their place.

This dance of the onlooker’s gaze may be meditative, or rather contemplative, if one bears in mind that to contemplate evokes the square patch of sky, and on earth (the templum), inside which the soothsayer views and interprets the omens.

In this way, what François Jullien calls the conversion of the gaze can take place: passing from observation (where the eye seeks out the information it needs to analyse the world around) to contemplation (the gaze plunges, allowing itself to be “absorbed” by the network of oppositions-correlations teeming on the surface).

So “the ‘Subject’ becomes unmade (
) both as initiative and as monopoly. Thus, instead of lasting only an instant, or at least the time it takes to observe, a gaze such as this has no reason, in fact, to stop evolving -- from one thing to another, or rather between them, borne by their polarities and losing itself in their profusion” (François Jullien, Vivre le paysage ou l’impensĂ© de la raison, Gallimard 2014, p. 38).

This conversion of the gaze, I should make it clear, is not metaphysical. It does not mean turning away from the earthly world to the world of ideas, it does not imply being cut off from the real world, on the contrary: it is entirely content to register phenomena -- traces, light, air -- instead of turning away from them or using them in order to discover some hidden meaning. It plunges the onlooker’s gaze into a chaos of material, inviting him or her to what Gaston Bachelard called a “cosmic dream”.

Screen-dream is an installation first presented for the DNAP (DiplĂŽme National d’Art plastique) in 2006 at ISBA, and in 2007 Le Manoir des Ducs de Lorraine (Épina, France), as a ‘Young invited artist’; it has also been exhibited at the Salon du livre d’artiste at Ornans (Doubs, France) and at the MarchĂ© de la poĂ©sie, Paris 2009.

5 / 5